Get Ready for Hurricane Season

HurricaneThink you’re prepared for a natural disaster?

AXA Art Insurance Corporation has produced a special report on preparing your art for hurricane season. It might also help those in non-hurricane prone areas prepare for other disasters and it’s a short three pages.

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2 thoughts on “Get Ready for Hurricane Season”

  1. I just checked the National Hurricane Center website where Tropical Depression 5 is aimed directly at Galveston. I have watched hurricanes long enough to know that when the storm is this far from landfall, nothing is certain. Since having to evacuate last year, though, we begin to think through our plan. I am writing to make an addendum to what was said in the advice from the New Orleans Museum. I am working at not putting all my art in one place. Last year I sat in Arlington watching a Galveston watercolorist’s studio burn as Katrina moved in. A crack addict who had remained on the island took shelter in the building where the studio was located. The trespasser had built a fire and it got out of control. Firefighters braved the wind and rain to extinguish the blaze. The artist lost everything, except the paintings that were still hanging in a gallery where she had held her last show. They were fine.

  2. I live in earthquake country, within 5 miles of the San Andreas Fault. Restraining stuff is the operable idea, here: Supplies, especially flamable, are kept in a box on a low shelf inside a closed cabinet. Paintings are hung on deep hooks, and to keep them from swinging I affix thick felt feet or non-skid shelf liner on the lower rear corners. In the frame storage area I fixed a strap that keeps small frames from bouncing off the shelf. Large frames and heavy stuff gets stored on the floor under the work table. If we have a rash of noteworthy temblors I take the large paintings off the walls and wrap them. The only damage I’ve had in my studio is to a frame I carelessly leaned against the wall on top of a wheeled tabouret.

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